Course /Tutor(s)

 

Research methods in geography

Credits: 4+0

Course type and contact hours / week: 3 lectures and 0 exercise,

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS):

Semester: 1.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

The aim of the course is to present the methods and approaches of geographical inquiry – both from the sides of physical and human geography.

 

Course description

The course presents the main methods of geographical research, including:

Scale issues: Resolution, analysis and synthesis in geography; The concepts, methods and scientifical analysis of the landscape; Participatory research methods in geography; surveys, in-depth interviews; Content analysis, discourse analysis; Participant observation; Getting information about the past and unmeasurable factors – palaeo data sources, proxy data; use of historical sources; Sampling methods and analysis in geography, numerical modelling in geography; Statistical analysis; Geographical processes in natural hazards; Scientific communication in geography – peer review system, basic structure of a journal manuscript

 

Learning outcomes

By completing this course, the students will be able to design and implement a geographical research and to interpret the findings of their research. They will become able to coordinate complex geographical researches with the use of multiple methods and data sources.

 

Skills and attributes

The course contributes to development of research and analytical skills of the students.

 

Literature:

Flowerdew, R. and Martin, d. (eds) (2006) Methods in human geography. Pearson, London

Gomez, b. and Jones III, J.P. (eds) (2010) Research methods in geography. Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford

Clifford, N., French, S. and Valentine, G. (eds.) Key methods in geography. Sage, London

Course coordinator(s):                                       Prof. Dr. Mezősi Gábor (DSc), Dr. Boros Lajos (PhD)

 
 

Spatial data collection

Credits: 3+1

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 1 exercise,

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 1.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

The aim of this course is to understand the basics of spatial data collection and evaluation and to be able to use field measurement techniques and instruments.

 

Course description

Introduction to spatial data acquisition, types and methods

Methods for field measurements

Remote sensing as primary data source

Using GNSS in geodesy and geoinformatics

Application of handheld computers in field measurements

Preprocessing of collected data

Calculation of results, evaluation of accuracy

Integration with GIS and 3D modelling environments

 

Learning outcomes

Students will know the possibilities and limitations of spatial data acquisition

Students will be able to use different field measurement instruments and methods

Students will understand the role of GNSS in geodesy and geoinformatics

Students will know the basics of remotely sensed data processing techniques

Students will be able to preprocess field measurements, calculate results and evaluate their accuracy

Students will know integrate and apply the collected data in GIS and 3D modelling environments

 

Skills and attributes

Students have a problem oriented attitude

Students are able to work efficiently in groups

Students are capable of individually collect spatial data on the field

Students can accurately use data collection techniques and tools

Students are capable of building spatial databases and 3D models

 

Literature:

NovAtel, 2015. An Introduction to GNSS

http://www.novatel.com/an-introduction-to-gnss/

Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)

https://www.princeton.edu/~alaink/Orf467F07/GNSS.pdf

Interpolation and Contour Mapping with Surfer

http://maps.unomaha.edu/Peterson/carta/Assign/Surfer.html

ESA, 2013. GNSS Data Processing Book. Volume I: Fundamentals and Algorithms

http://www.navipedia.net/GNSS_Book/ESA_GNSS-Book_TM-23_Vol_I.pdf

Course coordinator(s):                                            Dr. Szatmári József (PhD), Dr. Tobak Zalán (PhD)

Environmental systems

Credits: 3+1

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 1 exercise,

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 1.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

To give an overview on the functioning of environmental systems

To analyse the interrelationships between the environmental systems and society

Enables the students to adopt an informed personal response to different environmental issues

To increase the environmental awareness and responsibility of students

 

Course description

Basic characteristics of the environmental systems, their functioning and modelling. Examples on different environmental systems.

Definition of equilibrium in the different sciences. Threshold, sensitivity, disturbing factors and responses of the environmental systems. The aggression wave. Resistance of the environmental systems.

Steps of the sensitivity analysis. Its practical applications.

River catchments as systems, and the (de)coupling of their elements. Human impact on effective catchments, in different environments.

Human impact on rivers and on the surface. Sensitivity analysis on main Hungarian rivers, and ways of sustainable management.

 

Learning outcomes

Knowledge of complex environmental systems and environmental problems

Understanding of the foundations of environmental problems from an interdisciplinary approach.

 

Skills and attributes

Critical evaluation of information on human/environmental systems;

Integrative approach of environmental problems;

Demonstrate knowledge of complex theories of environmental problems; 

Develop relevant research questions for environmental sensitivity

Literature:

Walter J. Weber, Jr. 2000: Environmental Systems and Processes: Principles, Modeling, and Design. Wiley, 598.

Brunsden D. 2001: A critical assessment of the sensitivity concept in geomorphology. Catena 42, 99-123.

Thomas M.F. 2001: Landscape sensitivity in time and space, an introduction. Catena 42, 83-98.

Thorn CE., Welford M.R. 1994: The equilibrium concept in Geomorphology. Annals of the Assotiation of American Geographers, 84/4, 666-696.

Usher MB. 2001: Landscape sensitivity: from theory to practice. Catena 42, 375-383.

Werritty A., Leys F. 2001: The sensitivity of Scottish rivers and upland valley floors to recent environmental change. Catena 42, 251-273.

Course coordinator(s):                                           Dr. Kiss Tímea (DSc)

 
 

Space and Society

Credits: 3+1

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 1 exercise,

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 1.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

The aim of this course is to give an overview about the changing relationship between society and space from different perspectives (e.g. economic, political, environmental) and at different geographical scales (from global to local).

 

Course description

This course discusses different theoretical and methodological perspectives within human geography. The course consists of lectures and seminars, focusing on method training and verbal and written assignments. It provides a basic examination of the interconnections within and between physical environments and the human world. During the course the following topics will be discussed in details:

  • concepts on space and the evolution of human geographical thought;

  • space and place;

  • challenges of globalization and the weakening role of space;

  • flows of capital, culture and people;

  • place and identity;

  • cultural landscapes;

  • territoriality and power;

  • spatial disparities;

  • global environmental problems.

 

Learning outcomes

After successful completion of this course students are expected to be able to:

  • analyse the interaction between space and society from a historical perspective;

  • apply and design research methodologies for data collection;

  • assess the role of space in everyday experience and use;

  • classify and compare different types of space;

  • identify the role of actors in spatial conflicts.

 

Skills and attributes

The student’s skills in scrutinizing literature from its theoretical and methodological starting points will be improved.

Literature:

Atkins, P. – Simmons, I. – Roberts, B. (1998) People, Land and Time. Arnold, London.

Duncan, J. S. – Johnson, N. C. – Schein, R. H. (eds) (2004) A Companion to Cultural

Geography. Blackwell, Oxford.

Holt-Jensen, A. (1999) Geography. History and Concepts. Sage Publications, London.

Mitchell, D. (2000) Cultural Geography. A Critical Introduction. Blackwell, Oxford.

Valentine, G. (2001) Social Geographies: Space and Society. Pearson Education.

Course coordinator(s):                                           Prof. Dr. Kovács Zoltán (DSc)

Regional policy and spatial development

Credits: 3+2

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 2 exercises

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 2.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

The aim of the course is to understand the different needs and tools of regional planning and development. All students must recognize the changing priorities of certain region/country in time and the changing needs of people living there. They will learn how to distinguish the need for integrated approach in development policy, including social, ecological, economic and spatial issues.

 

Course description

The course will focus on major theories and schools of regional policy and spatial planning, to see the origins and basic needs for eliminating or moderating existing inequalities rooted in large scaled industrialization and later tertiarisation processes.

In the 2nd part of the course we will concentrate on selected countries as examples, how regional policy works in practice, how the priorities changed over time and space. Our interest will cover the non-EU area inside Europe (Switzerland, Norway, the Balkans), Eastern-Europe (Russia, Ukraine, Moldova), and some emerging economies from Asia (Turkey, China, India, South Korea, Thailand, Malaysia) and from Latin America (Mexico, Brazil).

 

Learning outcomes

The students will learn the most important types of modern and postmodern regional policies, and understand the differences among them, rooted in different needs and potentials of regions/countries. All country case-studies will help them to realize, how these types were combined in practice, and how the main focus of spatial planning became differentiated in the changing global economy.

 

Skills and attributes

The students will be able to identify different types of development practices, and predict the potential positive and negative effects, and risks of regional development actions/programs. In the seminar, the critical approach will be used in order to analyse the existing national and regional programs.

Literature:

Reggiani A., Button K., Nijkamp P. (edts) 2006: Planning models. Classics in Planning 2. Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham UK – Northampton, MA, USA.

Plane D.A., Mann L.D., Button K., Nijkamp P. (edts) 2007: Regional Planning. Classics in Planning 4. Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham UK – Northampton, MA, USA.

Wegener M., Button K., Nijkamp P., (edts) 2007: Planning History and Methodology. Classics in Planning 5. Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham UK – Northampton, MA, USA.

Course coordinator(s):                                         Dr. Nagy Gábor (PhD)

Environmental Risk Assessment

Credits: 3+0

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 0 exercise,

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 1.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

The course aims to explain the theoretical background (definitions, methodologies, strategies and management) related to Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA), discusses the different types of hazards and risks and evaluates the conclusions of past environmental incidences/catastrophes and management.

 

Course description

The course covers all the following main topics: definition and types of ERA; classification of environmental hazards/risks (natural origin: earthquakes, volcanism, floods, eolian processes and mass movements; anthropogenic origin: industrial, mining activities, transport, waste disposal) and spatial aspects of environmental risks; methods for evaluating environmental risks and the process of ERA; risk management strategies; definition and classification of catastrophes; catastrophe management and its legal background in Hungary.

 

Learning outcomes

The course will provide a detailed knowledge on the definitions and methods used in ERA. Lectures present separately the different types of environmental hazards and demonstrate the importance of geographic knowledge in ERAs. Besides the lectures on the theoretical background, past events (catastrophes) will be also demonstrated and evaluated together with the MSc students. The students will have a comprehensive understanding of the complex approach necessary for ERAs.

 

Skills and attributes

Based on the gained knowledge during the course, the students will be able to make decisions individually in their future work and research projects related to ERA and they will attempt to know and synthetize all the environmental factors and processes to ensure efficient assessment of environmental risks. They will be able to determine appropriate indicators for risk and hazard monitoring, furthermore to take part in mitigation or prevention measures.

Literature:

Bates, R. J. Jr. (1992): Disaster Recovery Planning. Networks, Telecommunications, and Data Communications. McGraw-Hill, ISBN 0--7-004128-8

O’Brien, M. (2002): Making better environmental decisions: an alternative to risk assessment

Wisner, B, Gaillard, JC, Kelman, Ilan (2012): The Routledge Handbook of Hazards and Disaster Risk Reduction. 875 p.

Smith K. (2013): Environmental Hazards: Assessing Risk and Reducing Disaster. 478 p.

Bobrovsky, T. (2013): Encyclopedia of Natural Hazards, 1175 p.

Course coordinator(s):                                         Dr. Ladányi Zsuzsanna (PhD)

Landscape planning

Credits: 3

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 0 exercise,

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 1.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims:

Based on some case study areas to shows the main issues of the landscape planning, landscape protection and landscape rehabilitation. The course also shows some sustainable planning case study of protected areas, the agricultural areas, mining areas, and the linear infrastructure (road) network. The students will be able to introduce into the planning methodology with group work planning exercises

 

Course description

1. The main issues and definitions of the landscape planning: Hierarchy and typology of landscapes, landscape potentials, landscape functions ecosystem services and carrying capacity of landscapes, anthropogenic pressures of landscapes, levels of hemeroby and it’s evaluation, ecological stability, landscape indicators, landscape metrics as indicators

2. Landscape analyses and evaluation: anthropogenic landscape changes, land use and land cover, landscape monitoring, historical and cultural landscapes, landscape character assessment

3. Urban Landscapes: Urbanization, Urban ecosystems, and it’s characteristic, Urban land use, Urban heat islands (UHI), Green areas as regulators of UHI, Basics of green way and blue way planning, Ecosystem services in urban areas

4. Main aims and principles of the landscape planning in different types of landscapes: Methodologies of landscape planning in natural or semi-natural protected areas, Methodologies of landscape planning in agricultural areas, methodologies of landscape planning in mining areas, methodologies of landscape planning in case of the road network planning

 

Learning outcomes

To get knowledge about methodologies of landscape planning especially in some case study areas.

 

Skills and attributes

The course participants get basic abilities for landscape planning. By practice in group works they will be able to improve the use of problem oriented holistic thinking. The students of this course will be able to choose the best planning methodologies and practices for landscape planning.

Literature:

Marsh, William M. 2005 Landscape planning : environmental applications 4th ed. New Jersey : Wiley,

Murat Ozyavuz (ed) 2012 Landscape Planning 372 p. Publisher: InTech, Chapters published ISBN 978-953-51-0654-8,

Course coordinator(s):                                           Dr. Szilassi Péter (PhD)

Project management

Credits: 1+1

Course type and contact hours / week: 1 lectures and 1 exercise,

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 2

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

The course aim is to introduce students the basic methods how to initiate, plan, execute, monitor, control and benchmark a project from the beginning to the closing. The course aim is to draw attention to the main areas of the management and to familiarize with project management software. The course also tends to introduce students the project system of the EU and EU member states highlighted the East Central European region.

Course description

The course consists of six mayor activities:

Lecture: traditional lectures on the basics and the advanced theory of project management

Demonstration Lecture – demonstrating the tasks with multimedia presentations and software

Laboratory classes - preparing and handling data, using project management software like MS Project, Gantt project and CAP and PERT diagram editors

Own work - continuing laboratory tasks

Team work – team assignments and presentation on a project

Field trip – introduction of best practices in the region

Learning outcomes

The students will be able to plan and manage complex projects in MS Project

They will have knowledge of the structure and tasks of project management, works stages. MS project

The students will be able to create individual projects.

The students will be familiar with the methods in measuring, evaluating, controlling projects

They will be able to create PERT (Project Evaluation Review Technique) charts and Critical Path Analysis (AoN, AoA)

The students will be able to create GANTT charts with GANTT Project

The students will be able to create SWOT analysis.

The students will be able to work in teams and prepare own project reports

The students will be able to prepare stakeholder analysis

Skills and attributes

Ability for managing individual projects

Ability for teamwork: Flexible team, adapts for various environments

Analytical and research skills: ability to assess a situation, seek multiple perspectives

Computer and software literacy in project management

Interpersonal skills: ability to relate to co-workers, inspire others to participate, and mitigate conflict

Flexibility skills: deals with multiple assignments and tasks

Commercial skills: ability for plans for commercial use

Literature:

Portny, S. E (2010): Project Management for Dummies, Wiley Publishing, p 347

PMI (2013): A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), PMI online material

Layton, C. M (2012): Agile Project Management for Dummies, Wiley Publishing, p. 331

Tillman, F. A. – Cassone, D. T. (2016) : Evaluating Products and Projects to Meet Corporate Objectives, HTX Corporate,  p. 54

Carlson, E. (2016): Project Management: From Conception to Practice, p. 174

Course coordinator(s):                                                       Dr. Bajmócy Péter (PhD), Nagy Gyula (MSc)

 

Environmental Geography

Credits: 3+0

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 0 exercise,

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 2.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

The aims of the course are to explore the interaction of human society with its natural environment and to highlight the major conflicts of this interaction. The above relationship is addressed primarily from the direction of the society, i.e. how humans affected and affect the environment, and what were and will be the consequences of these actions.

Course description

The course goes through the following topics in order to provide an overview on human-environment interactions concerning different environmental domains and also introducing a historical perspective.

  • Interaction of humans and their environment in prehistorical and historical times. How humans affected their environment in the Holocene, and how environmental changes affected human society.

  • Human impact on the living environment. Introducing the major types of human interventions on flora and fauna, being among the most sensitive elements environmental elements. Direct and indirect effects on the spreading and clearing of certain species and associations, and relevant consequences.

  • Impacts on land cover. The global perspective of changing landuse and land cover. Major trends and their relation to climate and environmental change. Methods of assessment, indices of change, future tendencies.

  • Human impact on soils. How intensifying agriculture changes physical and chemical soil properties. Soil erosion, salinization, acidification, compaction on a global scale. Hazards related to soil alteration. Major trends in management to reduce harmful consequences.

  • Human impact on waters. Major ways of affecting water and sediment quantity and quality in terms of rivers, lakes, ground water bodies, and coastal systems. Hazards and conflicts related to water scarcity and flooding.

  • Human impact on biogeochemical cycles. The basic setup, material and energy flow of most important biogeochemical cycles (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and oxygene), how they are altered by human activity and how does this alteration affect climatic and environmental processes.

  • Environmental conflicts in the urban landscape. The effect of urbanization on environmental elements and the ecosystem. Urban hotspots of air and water pollution. Waste production and waste disposal related conflicts.

  • Introduction of some major scenarios of future environmental change. The basics of scenario building. The role of scenarios in decision making and environmental politics.

  • Environmental ethics. The environment as an ethical question. The role of technology in changing environmental attitude. The value of nature and environmental elements. The idea of ecosystem services.

Learning outcomes

By completing the present course students will understand the interrelation between environmental change and past and present human impacts, and will recognize the effect of locally exerted changes on global processes. Students will also be able to outline the complex mechanisms underlying the human-environment interaction. Moreover, they will be able to evaluate the consequences of human intervention on various environmental elements, and they will also be able to communicate possible outcomes for decision makers and the society.

Skills and attributes

The present course on a student level will contribute to the development of integrated thinking, conceptualizing abstract and complex mechanisms, and individual problem assessment. On a group level the course will enhance group work abilities, and internal and external communication skills.

Literature:

Castree N., Demeritt D., Liverman D., Rhoads B. (eds): A Companion to Environmental Geography. Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.

Goudie A.: The Human Impact on the Natural Environment: Past Present and Future, 7th edition. Wiley-Blackwell, 2013. (student material at: http://bcs.wiley.com/he-bcs/Books?action=index&bcsId=8207&itemId=1118576578)

Withead M.: Environmental Transformations: the geography of the Anthropocene. Routledge, 2014.

Course coordinator(s):                                             Dr. Sipos György (PhD)

Visualization

Credits:  3+2

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 2 exercises

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 2.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

The aim of this course is provide the student a better understand of the basics of digital visualization of spatial data using desktop and online applications.

 

Course description

Introduction to spatial objects, coordinate systems and projections, scale and generalization

Data and map types; Map elements

Methods for digital thematic mapping

3D visualization

Dynamic maps, animation of spatial data

Output formats

Methods for online spatial data publishing

 

Learning outcomes

Students will know the possibilities and limitations of digital visualization

Students will understand how to use spatial objects to create maps

Students will be able to identify different types of data and properly visualize them

Students are able to identify and work at different spatial scales

Students will know how to use different map elements

Students will know how to apply different techniques to create thematic maps

Students will be able to use  methods to visualize data in three dimensions and in time

Student will know different ways to export results in different raster and vector formats

Student will be able to use web based visualization techniques

 

Skills and attributes

Students have a problem oriented attitude

Students are able to work efficiently in groups

Students are capable of individually create digital maps

Students can accurately use visualisation techniques and tools to share geographic information

Literature:

Pinde, F., Sun J. 2010, Web GIS: principles and applications. Esri Press.

Gretchen, N.P. 2009: GIS Cartography - A Guide to Effective Map Design.ISBN: 978-1-4200-8213-5, CRC Press, Boca Raton, 215 p.

Kraak, M.J., A. Brown 2001: Web cartography. ISBN: 0-7484-0869-X, Taylor & Francis, London, New York, 218 p.

Kraak, M.J., F.J. Ormeling 2010: Cartography: Visualization of Spatial Data, 3rd edition. ISBN: 978-0-273-72279-3, Pearson, Harlow, 236 p.

Cartwright, W., M.P. Peterson, G. Gartner 2007: Multimedia Cartography. ISBN 978-3-540-36651-5, Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 546 p.

Perez, A.S. 2012, OpenLayers Cookbook. ISBN: 978-1849517843, Packt Publishing, Birmingham, 284 p.

Course coordinator(s):                                  Dr. Tobak Zalán (PhD), Dr. Boudewijn van Leeuwen (PhD)

Environmental planning models

Credits: 2+3

Course type and contact hours / week: 1 lectures and 3 exercises

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 2.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

The aims of the course are that the students can get knowledge about the theoretical background of the environmental planning, modern approach of the basic theory of modelling. Further aim is to give practical knowledge about several software that are often used in modelling during environmental planning processes.

 

Course description

Environmental planning models in general. Their aims, roles and processes. Theoretical background and classification. Problems of the scale. From point based models via watershed based models to regional models. Transport models in hydrogeology and air pollution. Questions of interpolation. 3D models in environmental planning.

Practices via examples:

  • modeling infiltration and contamination in unsaturated soil and sediment

  • hydrogeological modeling with PMWIN in order to plan and harmonize water uses

  • runoff modeling to forecast and prevent floods

  • immission and air pollution models

  • interpolation with Surfer software

  • spatial modelling and visualization using GIS softwares.

 

Learning outcomes

Knowledge about the theoretical background of the environmental planning. Basic knowledge of software that are often used in modelling during environmental planning processes (e.g. Surfer, MODFLOW, HEC-RAS, WhiUnsat, QGIS).

 

Skills and attributes

The students will be able to collect and construe data necessary for environmental planning models. They can organize the datasets into special database in order to prepare them for the modeling processes. They can analyze and visualize the results given from the models and they can apply them in the decision making processes.

Literature:

Grayson, R. B. – Moore, I. D. – McMahon, T. A. 1992: Physically Based Hydrologic Modeling 1-2. Water Resources Research 26-28,. No. 10, 2639-2666.

Dragun, J. 1998: The Soil Chemistry of Hazardous Materials. Amherst, Massachusetts. 311-359.

http://www.cadfamily.com

http://trials.swstechnology.com/archive/Software/UnSatSuite/UnSat2203/Tutorials/VS2DT_Lab.pdf

http://www.waterloohydrogeologic.com/products/groundwater-modeling/unsat-suite-plus

http://soilerosion.net/doc/models_menu.html

http://www.hec.usace.army.mil/software/hec-ras/

Course coordinator(s):                                          Dr. Barta Károly (PhD), Dr. Szatmári József (PhD)

 

Hazard and risk of soil contamination and degradation

Credit: 3+3

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 3 exercises

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 3.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline:

Aims

The aim of the course is to give an overview about the importance, classification, changes of soil properties, sensitivity and vulnerability of soils. Further aim is to introduce the practical applications of pedology e.g. in agriculture, industry, urban environment, pollution modelling, or environmental protection

 

Course description

Economic importance of soils

Soil classification methods, international soil classification systems (WRB)

Temporal changes of soil properties, monitoring systems

Spatial changes of soil properties, soil mapping

Sensitivity and vulnerability of soils. Physical and chemical degradations.

Sources of pollution, role of soil components in sequestration and the buffer capacity of soils.

Environmental hazards (soil contamination, soil degradation) and selection of indicators for impact assessment.

Human health relations of soil use.

Alteration of soils in urban environment, Urban soils.

The impact of agriculture on soils. Soil compaction, nutrient content, chemicalization.

Industry and soils: management and reusability of wastes, composts, spoil heaps and soil-like materials; reusability. Phytoremediation.

Soil analysis in environmental protection. Problems of toxicity, assessment of contaminated soils and groundwater, threshold values.

 

Learning outcomes

Understanding the basic principles of soil protection and the main soil degradation processes and the potential methods for defence.

Knowledge for producing model based estimations of the risks of soil contamination on human health (using Risk software).

Knowledge for field surveying soil degradation (e.g. compaction and erosion) processes and evaluating the rate effects of it.

 

Skills and attributes

Problem recognition and solving.

Capability for self-processing information.

Literature:

Filep, Gy. (ed.) 1998: Soil Pollution. Agricultural Inuv. of Debrecen, p..301.

D.L. Rowell 1994: Soil Science (Methods & Applications. Longman Group UK Limited p.350.

Morgan R.P.C. 2005: Soil Erosion and Conservation. Blackwell Publishing. p. 304.

Dazzi C., Costantini E. (ed.): The Soils of Tomorrow (Soils Changing in a Changing World). Advances in Geoecology 39.

Course coordinator:                                                              Dr. Farsang Andrea, PhD

 

Meteorological hazards, their forecast and prediction, warning systems

Credit: 4 (3+1)

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 1 exercise,

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 3.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline:

Aims

Understanding the background of different scale weather hazards recently and in the future. Present of the measurement, modelling and management techniques of the hazards and risks.

 

Course description

Theoretical background of the hazards: Genesis and meteorological hazards of synoptic scale weather phenomena (tropical cyclon, cyclone storm); Genesis and meteorological hazards of meso-scale weather phenomena (thunderstorm, supercell, intensive rainfall events); Climate change in global, regional, urban and micro scales

Measurements of the necessary/typical parameters (used in the model later), mapping elements at risk: Measurement and monitoring the weather, forecast and now casting methods, weather warning systems; Climate monitoring systems in global, regional and urban scale

Modelling: Correction of the outputs of climate models using climate measurement data; Application of micro scale climate model

Private work: data acquisition, modelling, evaluation and risk analysis based on real/fictive dataset: Analysis of the effect of the climate change using climate model data in an arbitrary study area; Analysis of the climate modification effect of urban areas using the urban climate monitoring system

Management of the hazards and risks: Risk of the severe weather events for aviation, transportation infrastructure and industrial production; Risk analysis of the severe weather, techniques for the prevention and mitigation; Hazardous effects of the climate change, climate mitigation and adaptation strategies

 

Learning outcomes

Understanding the basic principles of meteorological phenomenas, space and time-based linkages.

Ability to recognise and define indicators to indicate the potential effects of environmental risks and disasters

Carrying out well-designed data collection

Capability for self-processing and organising information and developing data basis

The possibilities and the limitations of modelling

Performing operations with structured data basis and model building

 

Skills and attributes

Ability to work out protection and damage control solutions

Capability for visualisation and communication of results

Problem recognition and solving;

Proactivity and decision-making skills;

Literature:

Moran JM, Moran MD, 1996: Meteorology: The Atmosphere and Science of Weather. New York, MacMillan, 1996

Lamb HH, 2013: Weather, Climate and Human Affairs (Routledge Revivals): A Book of Essays and Other Papers. Routledge

Carlson TN, 1991: Mid-latitude weather systems. New York, Routledge

Oke TR, 2002: Boundary layer climates. Routledge

Foken T, Nappo CJ, 2008: Micrometeorology. Springer Science & Business Media

Course coordinator(s):                                                Prof. Dr. Unger János (DSc)

Hydrological planning

Credits: 4+1

Course type and contact hours / week: 3 lectures and 1 exercise,

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 4.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

The course aims to explain the theoretical background (definitions, methodologies, relations, legal background) related to Hydrological Planning (HP) and its application in practice.

 

Course description

The course covers all the following main topics: relations of the hydrological processes, definitions in the fields of hydrology and hydrogeology, hydrology of rivers, sediment transport, groundwater, extreme events, climate change and human adjustment to the hydrological processes; the Water Framework Directive of the EU, typology of water bodies, sustainable  water management; legal background of HP, administrative arrangements.

 

Learning outcomes

The course will provide a detailed knowledge on the definitions and methods used in HP. Lectures present the relations of the different water resources, the water management possibilities. The practical exercises help site allocations in industry and agriculture considering the aspects of water management (resources, contaminants, legal background). As a result, students will be able to participate actively in different phases of regional and local planning considering the approaches of environmental protection and water management.

 

Skills and attributes

Using the gained knowledge the students will be able to make decisions in water management planning individually or as a member of a planning team. The practical skills they learn help the realisation of a sustainable water management.

Literature:

Directive 2000/60/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council

Hendriks, Martin R. (2010). Introduction to Physical Hydrology. Oxford University Press.

Maidment, David R. ed. (1993). Handbook of Hydrology. New York: McGraw-Hill

Pokrajac,  Howard ed. (2010): Advanced Simulation & Modeling for Urban Groundwater Management.

GWP (2000): Integrated Water Management

Course coordinator(s):                                           Prof. Dr. Rakonczai János (DSc)

Vegetation description and analysis

Credits: 4+1

Course type and contact hours / week: 3 lectures and 1 exercise

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 4.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

The aim of this course is multiple. One goal is to provide a generic knowledge of the main vegetation types of the Pannonian basin, their function and their spatial patterns. In order to recognise them and be able to define their status it is important that the students know their characteristics. The other main goal of the course is to get the students familiar with vegetation description and analysis techniques, including both traditional and GIS-based methods.

 

Course description

The course consists of a lecture and a seminar. In the course of the lectures the students learn about the theory of vegetation analysis and mapping and also about the most important habitat types of the Carpathian basin (habitats on sand, loess and sodic soils, karstic and non-karstic hilly regions, wetlands) and their characteristics. In the course of the seminars they carry out vegetation mapping and analysis tasks using statistical and GIS methods.

 

Learning outcomes

By the end of the course, the students will be able to recognize the main vegetation types of the Pannonian basin, know their characteristics and will become familiar with their spatial patterns. They will be able to carry out some common vegetation description and analysis techniques, including both traditional and GIS methods.

 

Skills and attributes

Habitat recognition

The ability to evaluate the state of the given habitat

Knowledge of some vegetation mapping and analysis techniques

Literature:

Gábor Takács, Zsolt Molnár (2009): Habitat mapping (National Biodiversity Monitoring System)

http://novenyzetiterkep.hu/sites/novenyzetiterkep.hu/files/Takacs_Molnar_2009_Habitat_Mapping_2nd_edition.pdf

John Townend: Statistics for environmental and biological scientists (2002) Wiley

Martin Kent: Vegetation Description and Data Analysis (2011) Wiley

Course coordinator(s):                                         Dr. Tanács Eszter (PhD), Dr. Gulyás Ágnes (PhD)

Environmental protection in practice

Credit: 2

Course type and contact hours / week: 0 lectures and 2 exercises

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 2.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline:

Aims

The aim of the course is to introduce the background, main sectors and activities of environmental and nature protection from practical perspective.

 

Course description

Institutional and legislative background of environmental and nature protection

Environmental protection at municipality level

Environmental protection at regional level

Roles and activities of a mining authority

Practical issues of soil protection

Roles and activities of water management institutions, flood protection

Waste management

Transport and environmental protection

Nature protection and National Parks

Environmental programs

Environmental changes and their consequences

 

Learning outcomes

The students will be familiar with the legislative and institutional background of environmental protection

The students will be familiar with the levels of environmental protection

They will get a broad knowledge and understanding about the activities in different environmental protection sectors

They will be able to identify the main problems and issues of environmental and nature protection

 

Skills and attributes

Students have a problem oriented attitude

Integrative approach of environmental problems

Students can take initiative in decision making approach

Capability for self-processing information

Literature:

Andrew Farmer (2012) Handbook of Environmental Protection and Enforcement: Principles and Practice. Earthscan, 296 p.

National Research Council (U.S.) 2012. Science for Environmental Protection: The Road Ahead. National Academies Press. Washington, D.C. 233 p.

European Commission 2014. General Union environment action programme to 2020. Living well, within the limits of our planet. Luxembourg: Publications Office of the European Union, 87 p.

Course coordinator: :                                                   Dr. Ladányi Zsuzsanna, PhD

 

Spatial data analysis

Credits: 1+2

Course type and contact hours / week: 1 lectures and 2 exercises

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 3.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

The aim of this course is to provide a solid background in spatial data analysis by applying geoinformatics based methodology to geographical applications.

 

Course description

The course will consist of two main parts. First, the main spatial databases will be presented to the students. During the second part, students will learn how to process spatial data to receive meaningful results and how to evaluated their usefulness in geographic applications.

Data acquisition methods: Public data sources and their digitalization, applied digital data sources (raster and vector). Internet based data sets. Legal background of the use of spatial data.

Spatial databases: (access to) Thematic databases, creation of spatial databases, demonstration of applied geoinformatics systems, global and regional environmental monitoring programs.

Data processing and evaluation: Application of tools for raster and vector data spatial analysis in GIS environments.  Processing and interpretation of remote sensing data. Environmental analysis of time series. Application of geostatistics in spatial analysis (e.g.. trend, correlation). Processing and evaluation of (satellite based and landscape metrics) indices for environment and landscape assessment. Opportunities for spatial upscaling of point measurements of environmental data (soil, air, water, elevation). Landuse change analysis. Environmental assessment for decision making processes using own and public data. Use of web based information systems and spatial data infrastructures.

 

Learning outcomes

Students will be able to search and collect professional data from public sources in different content.

Students will be able to assess the quality and usefulness of spatial data

Students are able to identify and work at different spatial scales

Students will know who to store and manage spatial data in a database

Student will be able to use web based information systems

Students will learn to use GIS to process and evaluate spatial (raster and vector) data

Students will be capable of processing satellite data to retrieve meaningful information

Students will be able to calculate indices based on spatial data

 

Skills and attributes

Students have a problem oriented and results focused attitude

Students are able to work efficiently in groups

Students are capable of individually solve spatial problems

Students can accurately use geoinformatics to reach reliable solutions

Students can take initiative in decision making, thinking in system approach

Literature:

Chuvieco, E.; Huete, A. 2010. Fundamentals of satellite remote sensing. CRC press, p.436

Lovett, A.; Appleton, K. 2008. GIS for environmental decision-making. CRC press, p.260

O'Sullivan D., Unwin D, 2010, Geographic information analysis, John Wiley & Sons

Erdas Field Guide 2013. http://e2b.erdas.com/Libraries/Misc_Docs/ERDAS_FieldGuide_PDF_Intergraph_brand.sflb.ashx

Course coordinator(s):                                   Dr. Kovács Ferenc (PhD),

                                                                         Dr.Boudewijn van Leeuwen (PhD), Dr. Mucsi László (PhD)

Urban geography and urban planning

Credits: 3+1

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 1 exercise

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 2.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

The main aim of this course is to give an overview about contemporary concepts of urban geography (e.g. gentrification, marginalisation) with special attention to relevant social processes and urban economic restructuring. During the course students will also learn about the history and current practice of urban planning.

 

Course description

This course provides students with a better understanding of the global and local processes that shape cities today. During the course a number of interrelated themes will be explored like:

  • key concepts in urban geography;

  • historical forms of cities;

  • changing morphology of cities;

  • urban social movements;

  • urban inequalities and social justice;

  • socio-spatial dynamics of the city;

  • urban geographies of housing and workplaces;

  • foundation of urban planning;

  • studying urban agglomerations. 

These themes are explored in cities around the world and in East Central Europe, highlighting similarities and differences in the transformation of urban spaces and places 

 

Learning outcomes

Students will be able to identify various urban problems, they learn also how to address these problems in practice, with contributions from a range of fields including urban sociology, architecture, planning.

 

Skills and attributes

The course will enhance the analytical and research skills of students related to urban social problems.

 

Literature:

Bridge, G. – Watson, S. (eds.) (2013) The New Blackwell Companion to the City. Wiley-Blackwell.

Hall, P. (2012) Urban and Regional Planning. Routledge

Hall, T. – Barrett, H. (2012) Urban Geography (4th edition). Routledge.

 

Course coordinator(s):                                          Prof. Dr. Kovács Zoltán (DSc)

 
 

Rural Geography and Rural Development

Credits: 3+1

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 1 exercise,

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 3.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

The main aim of the course is to introduce the students the following topics:

Main features of classical geographical knowledge linked to rural geography;

Basic knowledge on rural development and management;

Skills related to modern rural development interventions.   

Course description

Main issues to be covered during the course:

Definitions of rural settlements, forms and functions of rural settlements, their historical development;

Urban-rural dichotomy, types of rural settlements (towns, villages, scattered settlements) and their role in integrative rural development;

Definitions of rural areas, roles of rural areas in regional development policies, relationship between classic and innovative rural resources, special networks and spatial movements of rural areas;

The role of accessibility as a main rural challenge, functions of microregions/rural districts, economic vitality of integrated rural development, the ecological, moral, cultural and social basics and conditions of integrated rural development;

Historical development of rural policies in the world (with focus on Europe and Hungary), the Cork Declarations, best practices in rural development, some postmodern ideas of rural development.

Learning outcomes

The lecture enables students to learn the basics of rural development processes based on geographical knowledge of rural areas and settlements. Students can obtain a comprehensive overview about the contemporary transformation of rural areas and the related challenges. On the basis of the knowledge provided by the course students can elaborate integrated rural development programmes.   

Skills and attributes

Enhancement of problem-solving capacities, interpretation of scientific texts, improving debate skills, obtaining interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches.

Literature:

Csatári, B. 2005: Criteria of rurality for the Hungarian micro-regions: Major problems facing rural areas in Hungary. In: Barta, Gy., G. Fekete, É., Szörényiné Kukorelli I., Timár, J. (eds.): Hungarian Spaces and Places: Patterns of Transition. Centre for Regional Studies of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Pécs. 466-482.

Csatári, B., Farkas, J. Zs., Lennert, J. 2013: Land Use Changes in the Rural-Urban Fringe of Kecskemét after the Economic Transition. Journal of Settlements and Spatial Planning, 4. 2. 153-159.

Gilg, A. W. 1985: An Introduction to Rural Geography. – Edward Arnold, London. 210 p.

Kovács, T. 2011: Agriculture in the Balkans. In: Horváth, Gy., Hajdú, Z. (eds.): Regional Transformation Processes in the Western Balkan Countries. MTA-RKK Pécs, 400-426.

Potter, R. B., Binns, T., Elliott, J. A. 2008: Geographies of development: an introduction to development studies. Pearson Education. Harlow. 443-490.

Robinson, G. M. (ed.) 2008: Sustainable rural systems: sustainable agriculture and rural communities. Ashgate Publishing Ltd. Aldershot. 210 p

Shucksmith, M., Brown, D. L. (eds.) 2016: Routledge International Handbook of Rural Studies. Routledge. London–New York. 698 p.

Course coordinator(s):                                         Dr. Hegedűs Gábor (PhD)

 

Political geography of the world economy

Credits: 3+2

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 2 exercise,

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 1.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

The aim of the course is to present the ideologies, concepts, approaches and theories which are crucial in understanding contemporary socio-economic and political processes; the working mechanisms of the global world economy; what kinds of political, economic and social forces shape the global processes, and who are the main actors of globalization.

 

Course description

The course presents the different approaches to globalization and the main actors shaping the contemporary socio-economic processes. The evolution of modern world economy and world system will be presented. The characteristics of neoliberalism and its effects on governmentality will also be discussed in details. The lectures also present the changing power geometries in the world. During the seminars the most relevant social theories will also be discussed.

 

Learning outcomes

By completing this course, will become familiar with the most important ideologies and their influence on recent political and thinking. The students will be able to understand the interplay of various actors and processes in the world economy and analyse the processes from a geographical point of view.

 

Skills and attributes

The course aims to enhance the analytical skills of students. The seminars also broaden the theoretical knowledge of the students. Through the discussion during the seminars, the discussion skills will also be developed.

 

Literature:

Dicken, P. (2015) Global shift -  Mapping the Changing Contours of the World Economy. Sage, London

Knox, P., Agnew, J. and Mccarthy, L. (2014) The geography of the world economy. Routledge, London

Harvey, D. (2007) A brief history of neoliberalism. Oxford University Press, Oxford.

Course coordinator(s):                                          Dr. Boros Lajos (PhD)

 

Local and regional economic development

Credit: 3+2

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 2 exercises,

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 4.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline:

Aims

The aim of the course is to present the theoretical background and the tools of the regional economic development planning practices.

 

Course description

The course presents the theories of local and regional economic development, the concept of competitiveness, the roles and potentials of clusters, networks, bottom-up initiatives in economic development.

The actors of economic processes and their role will also be discussed. Other important issues to be discussed: the significance of space in the economy, the significance of localities in the global economy, best practices and place-based policies, smart specialization and competitiveness, economic impact analysis.

As the part of the course, the students will analyze selected regions to unfold their potentials and problems and to determine the possibilities of development.

 

Learning outcomes

The students will become familiar with the key concepts and approaches of economic development,

They will become able to use the most important tools of economic planning and development.

Furthermore, they will be able to use regional science methods for analysis and to support decision making and strategic planning.

 

Skills and attributes

The course aims to enhance the following skills: strategic thinking, planning skills, spatial analysis

Literature:

Krugman, P. (1992): Geography and trade. Boston: MIT Press

Krugman, P. (1999): The spatial economy. Boston: MIT Press

Dicken, P. (2015): The global shift. New York-London: The Guilford Press

Boschma, R. – Martin, R. (2010): The handbook of evolutionary economic geography. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing

Course coordinator(s):                                                     Dr. Nagy Gábor (PhD)

 
 

Social Geography

Credits: 3

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 0 exercise,

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 1.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

The main aim of the course is to understand the basic theories of social geography including the main concepts and representatives. The other aim is to teach students how to prepare own questionnaires including different topics related to social geography, to carry out surveys, to fix the survey data and write an essay in the topic.

 

Course description

After some lectures of general topics of social geography (e.g. history, main theories, Munich concept, functions, social groups) we generate a questionnaire, fill it in groups, fix the data and the students write an essay in the related topic.

 

Learning outcomes

General theory of social geography, one of the main theoretical approaches of human geography.

 

Skills and attributes

Students will learn how to carry out own research, how to prepare own questionnaire, and collecting human geographic data. Fixing and analyzing the data as well as writing a scientific report on the related topic by the methods of social geography will also be among the potential skills.

 

Literature:

Del Casino, V. (2009) Social Geography. Wiley-Blackwell.

Smith, S.J. – Pain, R. – Marstin, S. A. – Jones, J.P. (2009) The SAGE Handbook of Social Geographies. Sage Publications

Course coordinator(s):                                            Bajmócy Péter (PhD)

 
 

Place marketing

Credits: 3

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 0 exercise,

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 3.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

The aim of the course is to get the students familiar with the theory and practice of place marketing and branding; its core concepts, goals, tools and possible applications.

 

Course description

The course presents the approaches to place marketing. The concepts of competitiveness, quality of life, sustainability (and their relevance to cities, regions and nations) will also be discussed in details. The possible strategies to be applied in place marketing will be presented.

Other relevant topics include: the connections between the city and the creativity and the concepts of creative and smart cities; mega-events and urban development; the tools of advertising for cities; city branding.

Case studies from various spatial scales and various regions will be applied to support the understanding of the processes and theories.

 

Learning outcomes

By completing this course, the students will become familiar with the approaches and tools of place branding, and the will be able to identify the challenges for place marketing and to contribute the elaboration of adequate strategies.

 

Skills and attributes

The course contributes to development of analytical skills of the students. Furthermore, they will become able to contribute to the development and implementation of place marketing strategies.

 

Literature:

Suggested reading

Avram, E. and Ketter, E. (2011) Media Strategies for Marketing Places in Crisis. Butterworth-Heinemann, Oxford

Ashworth, G. J. and Voogd, H. (1990): Selling the city: marketing approaches in public sector urban planning. Belhaven, London.

Kotler, P., Haider, D. and Rein, I. (2002) Marketing places. Free Press, New York

Musterd, S. and Murie, A. (2010) Making competitive cities. Wiles, Oxford

Course coordinator(s):                                          Dr Boros Lajos (PhD)

 

GIS in regional and urban planning

Credits: 0+5

Course type and contact hours / week: 0 lectures and 5 exercises

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 3.

Prerequisites: none

Course outline

Aims

The course introduces the advanced level of data-analysis and data-management. The course details the different methods for creating thematic maps. The course shows the geographers how to model urban sites in 3D and how to create urban land-use plans.

Course description

The course consists of four mayor activities:

Demonstration Lecture – demonstrating the tasks with multimedia presentations;

Laboratory classes - preparing and handling data, using statistics and mapping visualization;

Own work - continuous laboratory tasks;

Own work - individual assignments on the related topics.

Learning outcomes

The student will have basic knowledge about the structure and tasks of surveying works at the stages of data management and they will be able to collect, build and manage complex databases, to merge different datasheets and to create own queries within MS Access;

The student will be able to create different thematic maps (range, dot, pie and column diagrams and grid) and will have general knowledge concerning basic types of surveys, methods of processing and graphic presentation as maps. MapInfo;

The student will be able to use basic statistic methods in measuring regional and urban differences, moreover to apply advanced statistics to map the calculated values, to predict future processes for Impact Assessments. SPSS;

The student will know and understand the essence of assessing the accuracy of measurements and can define strategies and concept according to the results;

The student will be able to prepare urban plans and land-use plans and use georeferenced maps QGIS;

The student will be able to prepare basic visualization of urban plans and will understand the modes of 3D design SketchUP.

Skills and attributes

Ability for individual data-analysis and preparing assessments;

Analytical and research skills: ability to assess a situation, seek multiple perspectives;

Flexibility skills: dealing with multiple assignments and tasks;

Computer and software literacy in GIS;

Reading, writing and mapping related skills: being able to digest written information and present it in written and map form as well.

Literature:

Berke, P. R et al (2006): Urban Land Use Planning, University of Illinois Press, p. 504

Cromley, E. K. – McLafferty, S. L. (2011): GIS and Public Health, Guilford Press, p. 503

Foth, M. et al (2015): Citizens rights to the digital city, Springer, p.  257

Freedman, D. et al. (2007): Statistics, WW. Norton, p. 576

Hall, P. (2011): Urban and regional planning, Routledge, p. 271

Heiman, G. (2011):  Basic Statistics for Behavioral Science, Wadsworth, p 461

Ward, S. V. (2004): Planning and Urban Change, SAGE Publications, p. 320

MapInfo tutorial (online)

QGIS tutorial (online)

Course coordinator(s):                                                      Dr. Hegedűs Gábor (PhD), Gyula Nagy (MSc)

Geophysical hazards and risks

Credit: 3+1

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 1 exercise,

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 1st – optional subject

Prerequisites: none

Course outline:

Aims

The course aims to explain the theoretical background of plate tectonic related to geophysical events (earthquake, volcanism) and to evaluate the risk of these events.

 

Course description

Scientific background of geophysical hazards

Theory of global plate tectonics

Theoretical background of earthquakes, classification, measurements, scales

Areas of earthquake hazard on Earth, large earthquake events,

Causes and consequences of earthquakes

Basics of volcanology, processes and phenomena, hazard classification

Areas of volcanic activity, and the related  hazards and risks

Direct and indirect effects and impacts of volcanism (e.g. lahar, tsunami)

 

Learning outcomes

The course will provide a detailed knowledge on the definitions and methods used in evaluation of the risks related to the geophysical hazards.

 

Skills and attributes

Analytical and evaluating skills

To predict risks of development plans

Personal responsibility;

Capability for self-processing information

Collaboration in teamwork

Literature:

Anderson, D.L. (2013): New theory of the Earth. Cambridge University Press, 400 p.

de Boer, J.Z., Sanders, D.T. (2002): Volcanoes in human history: The far-reaching effects of major eruptions. Princeton University Press, 320 p.

Heiken, G. (2013): Dangerous neighbors: volcanoes and cities. Cambridge University Press, 196 p.

Marti, J., Ernst, G.J. (2008): Volcanoes and environment. Cambridge University Press, 488 p.

Plumer, C., Mcgeary, D., Carlson, D. (1999): Physical Geology. WCB McGraw, New York.

Prichard, H.M., Alabaster, T., Harris, N.B.W., Neary, C.R. ed. (1993): Magmatic processes and plate tectonics. London, The Geological Society.

Thompson, G. R., Turk, J. (1998): Introduction to physical geology. Saunders College Publishing, Orlando.

Wicander, R., Monroe, J.S. (1999): Essentials of geology. Wadswort Publishing Company, Belmont.

Course coordinator(s):                       Dr. Pál-Molnár Elemér (PhD), Prof. Dr. Rakonczai János (DSc)

 
 

Social aspects of environmental risks, hazards and justice

Credit: 3+1

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 1 exercise,

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester: 3rd – optional subject

Prerequisites: none

Course outline:

Aims

The course aim is to introduce students the social aspects of natural and environmental risks. The course describes various justice concepts which can be adapted in policy making. Students also will be able to measure risk, hazard and the degree of environmental injustices.

Course description

Approaches and perspectives of environment and society systems: The social construction of nature and environment definitions which are related to space, time and place. Political ecology, differences and its geographical aspects will be defined.

Understanding social connections to environment: Introduction to intertwined society and nature. Living with perils in the 21st c. and the meaning of risk society. Describes the representations of risks in urban and rural regions via individually and team processed case studies.

Perceptions of climate change caused disasters, civilizational catastrophes and coping strategies: What climate variability and vulnerability means in social context, what are the most common strategies to perceive risks and hazards. How can risks and hazard be measured in inhabited urban and rural areas using GIS technologies? What are the most debated social reactions and conflicts following environmental disasters or industrial catastrophes? GIS methods are presented via different case studies.  

Environmental justice, concepts, evidences and politics: Introduction to the definition and the three main elements of the claim-making of environmental justice. Environmental inequalities and their measurement processes in urban areas including air pollution, flood, waste sites, inland excess water, earthquake and hurricane. Environmental justice analyses in team work using theoretical frameworks and GIS.

Environmental management and urban planning: How planning can reduce risks and hazards in urban regions. How environmental justice can be reached by clear, fair and just environmental management and urban planning via introducing best and worst practices.

Learning outcomes

Practical knowledge in statistics connected to risk and hazard

Ability of measuring and calculating injustices

Ability of using self-study methods

Ability of active participation in policy making and planning process

Using advanced techniques in GIS

Skills and attributes

Know the possibilities and the limitations of modelling

Know how to prevent environmental hazards and risks, how environmental protection and remediation is made

Understanding natural environmental elements’ space and time-based linkages.

Preventing environmental risks and hazards, find or elaborate solutions for protection and remediation

To collaborate with decision makers, authorities and harmed people

Capability for self-processing information

Collaboration in teamwork

Problem recognition and solving;

Literature:

Harvey D. 1996. Justice, Nature and the Geography of Difference, Wiley-Blackwell,480 p.,

Walker, G. 2012. Environmental Justice: Concepts, Evidence and Politics, 248 p., ISBN: 978-0-41558-974-1

Joffe, H., Rossetto, T., Adams, J. : Cities at Risk - Living with Perils in the 21st Century, Springer, 194 p.,

Holifield, R., Porter, M., Walker, G. 2010. Spaces of Environmental Justice, Wiley-Blackwell, 272 p., R.

Steiner, F., Butler, K. 2007. Planning and Urban Design Standards, American Planning Association, 448 p.,

Course coordinator(s):                                           Prof. Dr. Kovács Zoltán (DSc), Nagy Gyula (MSc)

 

Research methods in physical geography

Credit:3+1

Course type and contact hours / week: 2 lectures and 1 exercises

Language of the course: English

Evaluation: exam mark and parctical exam mark (details: ECTS)

Semester:

Prerequisites: none

Course outline:

Aims

The aim of the course is to introduce the basics of designing physical geographic research projects, field and laboratory data collection methods that can be used to study physical geographical forms and processes, application of the research results.

 

Course description

A Scientific Approach to Environmental Risk and Hazard Studies. Fundamental Research Concepts.

Data Collection and Errors. Measurements in the Physical Environment. Behavioural Oservations and Archives. Explicit Reports: Surveys, Interviews and Tests. Experimental and Non-Experimental Research Designs. Sampling and its strategies. Statistical Data Analysis. Data Display. Reliability and Validity. Ethics in Scientific Research

 

Learning outcomes

The students will be familiar with the basic methods of designing, performing and demonstrating physical geographical research projects.

The students will be familiar with the basic field and laboratory data collection methods.

The students will get the knowledge of data analysis methods.

The students will be able to identify the potential scientific methods to analyze physical geographical forms and processes.

 

Skills and attributes

Ability to problem recognition and solving;

Capability for self-processing information;

Flexibility and adaptation capability to different circumstances;

Collaboration in teamwork;

Intuition and methodical approach

Literature:

Gomez B., Jones J.P. (eds) 2010: Research Methods in Geography: A Critical Introduction. Wiley, 480.

Montello D., Sutton P. 2013: An Introduction to Scientific Research Methods in Geography and Environmental Studies. SAGE Publications, 328.

Spence N., Owens A. 2011: Methods of geographical analysis. University of London

Clifford N., French S., Valentine G. 2010: Key Methods in Geography. SAGE Publications, 568.

Goudie A. (ed) 2006: Geomorphological techniques. George Allen & Unwin, 395.

Proctor J.P. 1998: Ethics in geography: giving moral form to the geographical imagination. Area 30/1, 8-18.

Course coordinator(s):                                           Dr. Blanka Viktória (PhD)